Metro executives say plans to cut city’s rising homicide rate will soon take effect


On January 3, LMPD officers were called near the corner of Northwestern Parkway and Bank Street following reports of a shooting. It was there that they found Jakia Holt. She was rushed to hospital in an attempt to save her life. According to her family, after arriving at the UofL hospital, she was placed on rescue machines. On Saturday she was removed from the resuscitation system and died. “It breaks my heart every time I see that one of our citizens has been killed because of senseless gun violence,” said subway board chairman David James. James said stories like these are getting far too common. “I was in a grocery store two days ago, and a woman walked up to me and told me her son had been killed the day before,” James said. “It just took the air.” He said the worst part about it was to think of how many other parents in recent years can say the same thing. However, he said the city was taking steps to make sure there weren’t many more. “We have fully funded the mayor’s initiatives for fighting violence and reducing gun violence, and we have really invested money and support behind GVI,” said James. GVI or Gun Violence Response is a strategy cities across the country have used to strengthen the relationship between law enforcement and their communities. The way it works is for community leaders to identify the most violent offenders in their area. Then, with the police, they have a meeting where the offenders are informed that they will face dire consequences if they do not stop committing crimes. If the offender wishes to change his life, then he is put in contact with social service providers who provide him with resources, training, etc. to be able to live a life free from violence. It’s a proven method of reducing homicide rates in Oakland, Chicago, Detroit, and New Orleans. He said the metro initially introduced the program in 2020, but has not been successful since. Now, with the newly added allocated funds, he said he has the capacity to make an immediate impact. “GVI will work,” James said. “But operationally and administratively it’s very important that we, as the City of Louisville, give her all the resources she needs to be able to work.” Until that produces results, he said, everyone will have to step up, as recently evidence has shown that no community is immune. “We all play a role in trying to make things better,” James said.

On January 3, LMPD officers were called near the corner of Northwestern Parkway and Bank Street following reports of a shooting. It was there that they found Jakia Holt.

She was rushed to hospital in an attempt to save her life.

According to her family, after arriving at the UofL hospital, she was placed on rescue machines. On Saturday she was taken off life support and died.

“It breaks my heart every time I see that one of our citizens has been killed because of senseless gun violence,” said subway board chairman David James.

James said stories like these are becoming far too common.

“I was in a grocery store two days ago, and a woman walked up to me and told me her son had been killed the day before,” James said. “It just took the air.”

He said the worst part about it was to think of how many other parents in recent years can say the same thing. However, he said the city was taking steps to ensure that few others can.

“We have fully funded the mayor’s initiatives to fight violence and reduce gun violence, and have really invested money and support behind GVI,” said James.

Abortion, or Intervention Against Gun Violence, is a strategy cities across the country have used to strengthen relationships between law enforcement and their communities.

The way it works is for community leaders to identify the most violent offenders in their area.

Then, with the police, they have a meeting in which the offenders are informed that they will face dire consequences if they do not stop committing crimes.

If the offender wishes to change his life, then he is put in touch with social service providers who provide him with resources, training, etc. to be able to live a life free from violence.

It is a method that has been shown to have reduced homicide rates in Oakland, Chicago, Detroit and New Orleans.

He said the metro initially introduced the program in 2020, but has since failed. Now, with the new funds allocated, he said it has the capacity to have an immediate impact.

“GVI will work,” James said. “But operationally and administratively it is very important that we, the City of Louisville, give it all the resources it needs to be able to work.”

Until he delivers results, he said everyone will need to step up, as recent evidence has shown that no community is immune.

“We all play a part in trying to make things better,” James said.


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