Metropolitan Hospital – Northwest Metropolitans http://northwestmetropolitans.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 13:55:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5.png Metropolitan Hospital – Northwest Metropolitans http://northwestmetropolitans.com/ 32 32 UMC patient stabs 2 other patients, killing 1 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/umc-patient-stabs-2-other-patients-killing-1/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 13:32:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/umc-patient-stabs-2-other-patients-killing-1/ LAS VEGAS, Nev. (FOX5) — A patient at University Medical Center fatally stabbed another patient and injured another, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police said. LVMPD said the incident happened around 1:50 a.m. on June 23 in the UMC psychiatric ward. The initial call to police was to report a person with a knife. LVMPD said […]]]>

LAS VEGAS, Nev. (FOX5) — A patient at University Medical Center fatally stabbed another patient and injured another, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police said.

LVMPD said the incident happened around 1:50 a.m. on June 23 in the UMC psychiatric ward. The initial call to police was to report a person with a knife.

LVMPD said a psychiatric patient, a man in his 40s, came out of his room armed with a knife. The patient entered the hospital room of the first victim, a man in his 20s, and stabbed him, LVMPD said. The victim was in soft restraints at the time.

Police said the suspect then walked out of the room and stabbed another patient who was in a hospital bed in the hallway of the ward. This patient, also a man in his twenties, was able to escape. LVMPD said he should be fine.

LVMPD corrections officers who were at the UMC with another patient heard the commotion and were able to respond within a minute, the LVMPD said. The suspect ran back to his room when he spotted the officers, police said. The suspect was eventually taken into custody.

Police said it was unclear how the patient obtained the knife. Police also said the suspect was not restrained prior to the incident.

Police did not say why the suspect was hospitalized or whether the man had a criminal history.

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Research: Rating Action: Moody’s Assigns Aa2 to Nashville and Davidson County Metropolitan Government, TN’s $621.3M GO Improvement Bonds, Series 2022A&B; outlook is stable https://northwestmetropolitans.com/research-rating-action-moodys-assigns-aa2-to-nashville-and-davidson-county-metropolitan-government-tns-621-3m-go-improvement-bonds-series-2022a-outlook-is-stable/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 18:01:43 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/research-rating-action-moodys-assigns-aa2-to-nashville-and-davidson-county-metropolitan-government-tns-621-3m-go-improvement-bonds-series-2022a-outlook-is-stable/ No related data. © 2022 Moody’s Corporation, Moody’s Investors Service, Inc., Moody’s Analytics, Inc. and/or their licensors and affiliates (collectively, “MOODY’S”). All rights reserved. THE CREDIT RATINGS ISSUED BY MOODY’S CREDIT RATINGS AFFILIATES CONSTITUTE THEIR CURRENT OPINIONS ON THE RELATIVE FUTURE CREDIT RISK OF THE ENTITIES, CREDIT COMMITMENTS, INDEBTEDNESS OR SECURITIES ASSOCIATED WITH INDEBTEDNESS, […]]]>


No related data.

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COVID-19 in Shanghai: 10 confirmed cases, 3 local asymptomatic infections https://northwestmetropolitans.com/covid-19-in-shanghai-10-confirmed-cases-3-local-asymptomatic-infections/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 00:54:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/covid-19-in-shanghai-10-confirmed-cases-3-local-asymptomatic-infections/ The city reported ten locally transmitted COVID-19 cases, three local asymptomatic infections, five imported cases and three imported asymptomatic infections on Sunday, the Shanghai Health Commission said Monday morning. 10 confirmed cases All tested positive during the central quarantine. No deaths have been reported. Local asymptomatic infections The first two tested positive during the central […]]]>

The city reported ten locally transmitted COVID-19 cases, three local asymptomatic infections, five imported cases and three imported asymptomatic infections on Sunday, the Shanghai Health Commission said Monday morning.

10 confirmed cases

All tested positive during the central quarantine.

No deaths have been reported.

Local asymptomatic infections

The first two tested positive during the central quarantine while the rest were found during screening of high-risk groups.

Imported cases

The first case is a Chinese working in Chad who arrived at Shanghai Pudong International Airport on June 10 via France.

The second case is a Chinese student in the UK who arrived at the local airport on June 11 via Austria.

The third case is a Chinese studying in the United States who arrived at the local airport on June 16.

The fourth case is a Chinese studying in the United States who arrived at the local airport on June 17.

The fifth case is a Chinese student in the UK who arrived at the local airport on June 17 via Finland.

All patients have been transferred to a designated hospital for treatment, while 74 close contacts on the same flights with them have been quarantined.

Imported asymptomatic infections

The first case is a Chinese working in Niger who arrived at the local airport on June 3 via France.

The second case is a Chinese working in France who arrived at the local airport on June 10.

The third case is a Chinese student in the UK who arrived at the local airport on June 11 via Austria.

All cases have been transferred to a designated hospital for observation, while their close contacts on the same flights have been quarantined.

Meanwhile, 17 confirmed patients and 45 asymptomatic infections have been discharged.

From February 26 to June 19, of the total 58,114 local confirmed cases, 57,431 have been discharged after recovery and 95 are still hospitalized, including three severe cases and four critical cases. A total of 588 deaths have been reported.

So far, out of all 4,671 imported cases, 4,637 have been discharged after recovery and 34 are still hospitalized.

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Oregon State Hospital must comply with court order, report says – Oregon Capital Chronicle https://northwestmetropolitans.com/oregon-state-hospital-must-comply-with-court-order-report-says-oregon-capital-chronicle/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 01:15:43 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/oregon-state-hospital-must-comply-with-court-order-report-says-oregon-capital-chronicle/ An independent expert has called on Oregon State Hospital to speed up discharges and admit patients waiting for jail sooner to reduce the ongoing backlog of bed demand. The hospital is under a federal court order to admit aid and support patients within seven days. They are patients in prison waiting for mental health treatment […]]]>

An independent expert has called on Oregon State Hospital to speed up discharges and admit patients waiting for jail sooner to reduce the ongoing backlog of bed demand.

The hospital is under a federal court order to admit aid and support patients within seven days. They are patients in prison waiting for mental health treatment to enable them to participate in their defense.

The hospital is also under federal orders of fix several issues who were identified by an investigation of a patient who escaped late last year. At the same time, hospital officials are trying to fill dozens of jobs to make up for a staff shortage.

The recent recommendations on admissions and discharges came in the latest report from an independent expert who was hired under an agreement between the health authority, which oversees the hospital; Oregon Disability Rights; a Portland-based public defense firm, Metropolitan Public Defenders Services; and sick. They sued the state for delays in admitting aid and support patients, who occupy just over half of the hospital’s beds. The hospital had a court-approved suspension of the seven-day admission order during the pandemic, but that was lifted.

The public hospital is almost at capacity, according to the report. With approximately 750 beds under agreement, nearly 710 are occupied. They include approximately 560 at the main Salem campus and 145 at the Junction City campus.

Awaiting discharge patients who find themselves stuck in hospital with nowhere to go continue to be a problem while help and support patients languish for days in jail.

The consultant, Dr. Debra Pinals, a Michigan psychiatrist who has worked with other states on similar issues, filed her first report in January. The second, published on Tuesday, contained multiple recommendations.

The director of the Oregon Health Authority greeted them.

“I am encouraged by the thoroughness of Dr. Pinals’ work and his careful assessment of the capacity challenges facing the state,” Allen said in a statement. “I think his recommendations are reasonable and achievable and I look forward to seeing them implemented.”

Pinals said the hospital had improved admissions between its two reports, but noted that recently wait times and the waiting list have started to grow.

“The state is to be commended, along with the community, for all efforts to turn people away who do not need hospital care,” the report said, adding that this trend must continue.

As of May 1, nearly 70 patients receiving help and assistance were waiting to be admitted with an average wait time of 16 days. This marked a drop from late January, when admissions were suspended due to a Covid outbreak.

The report calls on the hospital to better track hospital census, admissions and discharges. He also called for more transparency, including the development of a public website with legal actions, budgets and other documents and data. He said the hospital should develop a patient assessment process that includes people with mental health issues to make consistent and transparent placement decisions.

Many recommendations focused on reducing wait times to enter and leave the hospital. He said to comply with the seven-day order, the hospital would have to discharge aided and assisted patients when deemed capable. Since the pandemic hit, the hospital has held these patients for an additional 30 days when they challenged their fitness determination.

“This has helped extend the length of stay for many people,” the report said.

The report found that since 2012, 15% of patients receiving help and assistance had stayed longer than six months in hospital. If administrators limited those patients to six months, the hospital could accommodate 130 more patients a year, according to the report.

Pinals said state employees should assess patients who help and assist in prison sooner to identify patients who no longer need hospital care and arrange treatment in the community.

At the same time, the report noted that more than a third of patients receiving help and assistance had been hospitalized several times, compared to 10% of those who had been civilly or voluntarily committed.

Community support

Pinal recommended that the state establish better community support for patients once they are released, an idea welcomed by Disability Rights Oregon.

“It is widely believed that expanding home and community services – the full continuum in every Oregon county – will ensure people with disabilities get the services and supports they need to stay in homes,” said Emily Cooper, an attorney for the organization. “We know that not only will this allow people to be served at home, but it could also disrupt the revolving door of people entering and exiting the criminal justice system.”

Part of this support should be a “community navigator” who works with discharged patients.

“You can think of him as a super-charged case manager — someone to help you navigate the hoops of getting and maintaining a continuum of service,” Cooper said.

The report says the state should have a community browser pilot program ready by December.

Hospital officials should also work with community providers to help discharge other patients, Pinals said.

“The public hospital must be able to make room for new admissions to OSH and place people who no longer need institutional care in a less restrictive setting,” the report said.

He called on the state to gradually reduce admission wait times, reaching the seven-day limit by next February.

Between Pinals’ two reports, an aided and assisted patient died in the Washington County Jail. Cooper said the death could have been avoided.

“He had been waiting 10 days for admission,” Cooper said. “If the state was able to transport him within seven days, this patient could still be alive.”

He had stopped eating and drinking in prison and died of malnutrition and dehydration, she said.

The Washington County Health Department did not respond to a request for comment late Wednesday afternoon.

She said Disability Rights Oregon was concerned about the potential harms associated with extended prison stays. She said the organization would continue to consult with attorneys for locked-in patients “to try to mitigate damages from now until the state is in compliance.”

The report also called for legislative changes. Pinals noted that Oregon law places no time limits on hospital stays. The hospital keeps patients for the duration of their sentence or for three years, whichever is shorter.

Pinals said the reprieve for those charged with misdemeanors should be the maximum sentence for their crime or 90 days, whichever is shorter. Patients charged with crimes must be treated for a maximum of six months, unless the offense involves “serious violence”. These patients should stay longer, but no longer than a year, according to the report.

Cooper said the report comes at the right time. The health authority recently announced hundreds of millions of dollars in spending on behavioral health and addiction treatment services. The money will be used for workforce training, increased provider reimbursements, treatment and housing.

“The state has unprecedented funds for nearly a year to fund behavioral health – the whole continuum. They now have the resources in the state coffers. They now have a plan on how to prioritize their actions said Cooper.

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Man dies after entering River Thames when police try to arrest him https://northwestmetropolitans.com/man-dies-after-entering-river-thames-when-police-try-to-arrest-him/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 16:48:04 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/man-dies-after-entering-river-thames-when-police-try-to-arrest-him/ A man who ended up in London’s River Thames after police fired a stun gun in an attempt to arrest him on Saturday has died in hospital, according to the Metropolitan Police. The family of the man, believed to be in his early 40s, has been notified, the Met said. The Met said it immediately […]]]>

A man who ended up in London’s River Thames after police fired a stun gun in an attempt to arrest him on Saturday has died in hospital, according to the Metropolitan Police.

The family of the man, believed to be in his early 40s, has been notified, the Met said.

The Met said it immediately referred the incident to the police watchdog, the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC), which has launched an investigation.

According to the Met, officers received a report at 9.03am on Saturday that a man was armed with a screwdriver and shouting on Chelsea Bridge Road.

The force said officers arrived at the scene shortly after the call and challenged a man on Chelsea Bridge.

“A Taser was discharged but this did not allow officers to hold him safely,” the Met said, adding that the man “then walked into the river”.

“A rescue operation was immediately organised,” the Met said.

The man was pulled from the river by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and taken to hospital in critical condition. He died in hospital on Saturday evening.

Frontline Police Commander Alexis Boon offered his condolences to the man’s family “for their tragic loss”, and said the Met will “cooperate fully” with the IOPC Fund.

Steve Noonan, director of the IOPC Fund, said on Sunday the watchdog had reached out to the man’s family to offer their “sincere condolences” and explain their involvement.

“Our independent investigation is ongoing into the actions of the police on the bridge and we have begun to collect and review the evidence,” he said.

The IOPC said it was investigating what contact Met officers had with the man before he ended up in the Thames.

“We were notified by the Metropolitan Police on Saturday and have sent investigators to the scene and to police post-incident procedure to begin our investigation. Early information indicates officers were responding to reports of the disturbance when they encountered the man on the bridge. During the incident, the Taser was deployed,” the watchdog said in a statement.

“Investigators have secured video footage carried by police and initial accounts have been obtained from the officers involved. The Taser used was also collected and will be analyzed. Investigators oversaw the forensic examination of the scene.

Chief Detective Inspector Rory Wilkinson of the Met’s Central West BCU said on Saturday: ‘I understand that there are always concerns about incidents in which people are injured after coming into contact with police.

“All Met officers know they are responsible for their actions, and a full investigation is underway to establish exactly what happened.”

Follow

Lily Zhou is a freelance writer who primarily covers UK news for The Epoch Times.

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Wellstar Douglas Hospital failed to provide proper patient care https://northwestmetropolitans.com/wellstar-douglas-hospital-failed-to-provide-proper-patient-care/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 23:17:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/wellstar-douglas-hospital-failed-to-provide-proper-patient-care/ ATLANTA, Ga. (CBS46) – CBS46 News has uncovered a state investigation that outlines the pitfalls of treatment by a metro Atlanta hospital after a teenager with COVID-19 died after being discharged twice. “I can’t understand why they would do it like that,” said Tosha Nettles, mother of Tyler Fairley, who died in 2021. “That experience […]]]>

ATLANTA, Ga. (CBS46) – CBS46 News has uncovered a state investigation that outlines the pitfalls of treatment by a metro Atlanta hospital after a teenager with COVID-19 died after being discharged twice.

“I can’t understand why they would do it like that,” said Tosha Nettles, mother of Tyler Fairley, who died in 2021. “That experience I will never forget.”

Nettles struggles to understand why her 17-year-old son, Tyler, hasn’t received the health care she says she desperately needs.

She said he contracted COVID-19 on July 23, 2021 and she took her son to Wellstar Douglas Hospital for treatment twice. The first time she said he was diagnosed with pneumonia and sent home. The second time she said he went out and was told to hydrate.

A few days later, her son tragically died.

“They just downplayed his illness,” Nettles said. “When I read the report, it confirmed everything I was saying.”

The Georgia Department of Community Health investigated the case and said in its report that “it was determined that the facility had failed to provide the required stabilizer treatment.”

The report goes on to state that this posed an immediate and serious threat to the health and safety of the patient and also delayed the treatment of his emergency medical condition.

“When we were out the doctor came in and he said they had done a chest X-ray and one side of his lungs was clearing up where the pneumonia was. But the other side was still the same, and they also did an ECG which was fine.When I read the report and investigation, it actually came back abnormal.

CBS46 contacted Wellstar Douglas Hospital and they responded with this statement saying, “We strongly disagree with this report and have submitted a written objection to these preliminary observations. All of our hospitals strive to provide high quality care and undergo regular continuous improvement processes to achieve this goal. All hospitals, including Wellstar Douglas Hospital, are reviewed by external agencies and this document is a preliminary report issued by one of those agencies. We strongly disagree with this report and have submitted a written objection to these preliminary observations. Unfortunately, the hospital’s written objection is not available for public review, due to patient privacy concerns, and we are currently awaiting the decision on this matter.

Wellstar went on to say that all hospitals are reviewed by external agencies and this document is a preliminary report.

“There’s sadness, there’s anger and there’s a lot of emotion because of it. I feel like my son could have still been here if they had adhered to medical care. for him,” she added.

Wellstar Douglas Hospital told CBS46 News that the hospital’s written objection to the report was not publicly available and that they are currently awaiting a response from the state.

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St. Louis hospitals see surge in nursing vacancies https://northwestmetropolitans.com/st-louis-hospitals-see-surge-in-nursing-vacancies/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 10:01:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/st-louis-hospitals-see-surge-in-nursing-vacancies/ The percentage of vacant nursing positions at St. Louis-area hospitals has risen sharply since the start of the coronavirus pandemic and presents significant concerns for staffing and patient care, according to the Missouri Hospital Association. The association collected data from 33 hospitals in the St. Louis and Metro East area in 2021, and from 35 […]]]>

The percentage of vacant nursing positions at St. Louis-area hospitals has risen sharply since the start of the coronavirus pandemic and presents significant concerns for staffing and patient care, according to the Missouri Hospital Association.

The association collected data from 33 hospitals in the St. Louis and Metro East area in 2021, and from 35 hospitals the previous year.

He revealed that registered nurse vacancies in the metro area increased from 11.2% in 2020 to 20.3% in 2021, when hospitals ended the year with 3,681 registered nurse vacancies. Hospitals have also seen their turnover increase.

In Missouri, vacancies for staff registered nurses rose to 19.8% in 2021, the highest rate since the hospital association began reporting 21 years ago. Missouri has 33,692 nurses working in hospitals, but 8,334 vacant nursing positions.

The report notes that nurses were quitting their jobs before the pandemic. But the virus, competitive salaries in agencies and the desire for a different place to work have led many people to quit their jobs in the past two years. These departures posed challenges for the nurses who stayed on.

“Turnover affects the culture and pace of an organization, but these vacancies put a lot of pressure on the workforce currently employed,” said Dave Dillon, vice president of public and media relations for the association. hospital.

“It also deals with all the different things that have happened over the last two years,” Dillon said. “So they’re under a lot of stress and they’re taking shifts and/or working for the people that we really need but can’t find.”

Jobs for certified respiratory therapists, medical laboratory technicians, licensed practical nurses and surgical technicians were the toughest positions to fill for hospitals in the St. Louis area.

The report found that having fewer nursing educators in universities is contributing to the shortage of nurses, as some schools do not have enough faculty to accept qualified students. He notes that more than 10,400 nursing students were enrolled in nursing schools across the state in 2020, but nursing schools turned down nearly 1,300 qualified applicants that year.

University of Missouri-St. Dean of the Louis School of Nursing, Roxanne Vandermause, said the pandemic has brought to light staffing issues that have existed across the country for years.

“Nursing retention has been an issue over time,” Vandermause said. “The pandemic has certainly affected nurses, and it has affected hospitals in ways that may have exacerbated future problems.”

Vandermause said the pandemic, retirements and departures from the field have all contributed to the shortage. She said it was essential for nursing schools to focus on educating nurses and encouraging them to continue their education throughout their careers and to teach future nurses.

“We want to start from scratch, educating young nurses to look beyond and recognize that there is a trajectory, an educational trajectory available to them if they choose to follow it,” Vandermause said.

Follow Chad on Twitter: @iamcdavis

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Internet searches and heat-related ER visits in the United States https://northwestmetropolitans.com/internet-searches-and-heat-related-er-visits-in-the-united-states/ Tue, 31 May 2022 09:34:18 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/internet-searches-and-heat-related-er-visits-in-the-united-states/ Ebi, KL et al. Chapter 14: Human Health. Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States: The Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II. (2018) https://doi.org/10.7930/NCA4.2018.CH14. Smith, KR et al. Human health: Impacts, adaptation and co-benefits. Air conditioning Chang. 2014 Impacts, Adapt. Vulnerability Part A Glob. Sect. Aspic. 709–754 (2015) https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107415379.016. Sarofim, M. et al. Temperature-Related […]]]>
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    Fairfax County homeless issue examined as some sleep in tents https://northwestmetropolitans.com/fairfax-county-homeless-issue-examined-as-some-sleep-in-tents/ Sun, 29 May 2022 10:08:19 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/fairfax-county-homeless-issue-examined-as-some-sleep-in-tents/ Placeholder while loading article actions In 2008, Fairfax County launched an ambitious “Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness,” with the goal of ending homelessness in suburban northern Virginia within 10 years. While homelessness has fallen by more than a third since that deadline was set, tented encampments in the woods, including one a short walk […]]]>
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    In 2008, Fairfax County launched an ambitious “Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness,” with the goal of ending homelessness in suburban northern Virginia within 10 years.

    While homelessness has fallen by more than a third since that deadline was set, tented encampments in the woods, including one a short walk from the satellite country’s government center in Reston, show the aim to reduce the number to zero is still far from being achieved.

    The County Board of Supervisors recently ordered a review of Fairfax’s homelessness prevention efforts, joining other localities in the region that have grappled with a problem that, while diminishing, has become more visible. during the coronavirus pandemic.

    Some supervisors expressed frustration with limited progress after several hundred people returned to the streets in early spring, prompted by the closure of seasonal hypothermia shelters that operate between December and April, and the end of a program pandemic in March which housed the homeless inside hotels. .

    “Some things never change and that’s very, very disturbing,” Supervisor Penelope Gross (D-Mason) said Tuesday before the board approved a review motion.

    Nearly 1,200 people in Fairfax are considered homeless, according to a spot count taken in January. That’s about 35% less than the number of homeless people in the county in 2008.

    But, after a spike in homelessness in 2020, there are 204 more homeless people in Fairfax than there were in 2018, according to a report on homelessness in the area released earlier this month. here by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.

    Some use their cars as their beds in this wealthy Virginia suburb

    With about 282 adults sleeping on the streets, while others are staying in emergency shelters or another form of temporary housing, county officials are looking for ways to add more shelter beds and sleeping options. accommodation in Fairfax.

    There are six county-owned emergency shelters in Fairfax operated by local nonprofits with a total of 510 beds in a mix of spaces for single adults or entire families. Some facilities have a waiting list of several hundred people to enter.

    There are also 670 beds available in supportive housing complexes which offer mental health counseling, job training, financial literacy and other services, in addition to a place to sleep, also with long lists of waiting. Other programs provide emergency rent and utility payments and access to affordable child care for people at risk of losing their homes.

    The Board of Supervisors has asked county staff to seek out sites where more supportive housing could be developed. The county will also consider building more emergency shelters in commercial and industrial areas of Fairfax, a more viable option after the pandemic forced some businesses to close.

    Sarah Selvaraj D’Souza, executive director of Reston Strong, said her community group is pushing for the alternative. The organization, originally set up in 2020 to help those suffering from the pandemic, has helped dozens of homeless people who were living in tents in the Reston area.

    She pointed to several large commercial sites around the community that would make good candidates for temporary housing. A Best Buy store recently closed and is vacant. A closed elderly rehabilitation center at Inova Hospital has been vacant since 2014, used as a sleeping place by some homeless residents until in February they were forced out of the facility, which is boarded up and must be demolished. “We have a lot of space here,” she said.

    In April, Reston Strong sought to bring more urgency to the issue by helping people who were forced out of a nearby hypothermia shelter after it closed for the season to set up tents outside County County. Fairfax North Governmental Center, which houses the Supervisor’s office. Walter Alcorn (D-Hunter Mill) and a county police station.

    Many of those people were previously staying at area hotels as part of the county’s Quarantine, Shield, Isolate and Decompression Program, launched in 2020 as a way to guard against the spread of the coronavirus.

    But that temporary program ended in March, in part because coronavirus vaccinations are now widely available in Fairfax, but also because nonprofits in the area struggled to keep it staffed and that hotel rooms were harder to come by after the region’s tourism industry rebounded.

    “We don’t want people living in tents. This is absolutely not what we advocate,” Selvaraj D’Souza said. “But what options did they have?”

    All but two of these tents have now disappeared after the ‘Neighbors in Tents’ campaign, involving food and water donations to tent dwellers, received some publicity. The tent dwellers moved to a nearby wooded area.

    But the message resonated with county officials. Alcorn has created a community task force to develop a master plan for the Reston area that will include more permanent supportive housing and improvements to the Embry Rucker emergency shelter.

    How is Mayor Bowser’s promise to end homelessness going?

    “We need more shelter beds,” Alcorn said in an interview, calling it “a moral obligation” to provide as many solutions as possible for homeless people. “We are short.”

    Another barrier has been the inability of local nonprofit and faith-based organizations that run homelessness prevention programs to retain staff and volunteers, a problem related to stress and lower pay than the one could win in the private sector which has been compounded by concerns over the coronavirus infection, county officials said.

    “Turnover is generally quite high among shelter staff,” said Thomas Barnett, deputy director of the Office to Prevent and End Homelessness. “This creates challenges, in creating stability and high quality services.”

    Maura Williams, vice president of housing and community services at nonprofit Cornerstones, said it was particularly difficult to keep staff working through the county’s hotel program. Cornerstones had operated one of six hotels used for this program, serving around 90 people, with the understanding that it would be for three months. Then the program was extended several times.

    “It was great for the program, but you lose staff when it happens because they figured it was going to end on a certain date,” Williams said. “During the pandemic, we were in a constant state of hiring. I don’t think we’ve ever been able to stop and say, ‘Okay. We are complete.

    Jeffrey C. McKay (D-At Large), county council chairman, said the local homelessness problem could be much worse after thousands of people lost their jobs during the pandemic in an area where it is difficult to find affordable housing.

    It shows that many homelessness prevention programs in the county have worked, he said. But, as some people leave the streets, others become new homeless, which “feels like being on a treadmill”, he added.

    The review of the county’s homelessness prevention plan aims to find out “what works with regularity?” he said. “What is a waste of resources? What is another jurisdiction doing that is a best practice that we should try to experiment with here? »

    Outside her tent in the woods near the Reston Government Center, Joan McDonald said she just wanted a place she and her unemployed friend can afford on the $24 an hour wage she she earns as a bus driver.

    McDonald, 48, has been homeless since 2016, after his brother asked him to leave his home in Springfield to make room for their sick parents. She and her friend, who became homeless after her husband left, have been in their tent in Reston since February.

    The subsidized apartments they have been offered are still overpriced at around $1,500 a month, when factoring in other expenses, McDonald said. “It hurts,” she said, sitting at a picnic table in her bus driver’s uniform after finishing her shift.

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    The wave of COVID-19 appears to be receding as trends improve in Minn. https://northwestmetropolitans.com/the-wave-of-covid-19-appears-to-be-receding-as-trends-improve-in-minn/ Fri, 27 May 2022 17:00:02 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/the-wave-of-covid-19-appears-to-be-receding-as-trends-improve-in-minn/ Several COVID-19 trends have improved in Minnesota over the past week, suggesting a spike in the latest pandemic wave before what health officials hope will be another mild summer for the state. The number of federally designated counties in Minnesota at high risk for COVID-19 fell from 19 to 7, and statewide sampling this week […]]]>

    Several COVID-19 trends have improved in Minnesota over the past week, suggesting a spike in the latest pandemic wave before what health officials hope will be another mild summer for the state.

    The number of federally designated counties in Minnesota at high risk for COVID-19 fell from 19 to 7, and statewide sampling this week found less evidence in sewage of the coronavirus which causes the infectious disease. The seven-day average of new infections in Minnesota also rose from 2,138 per day on May 11 to 1,805 on May 20 – although this is only based on publicly available tests and not home test results.

    Hospitalizations for COVID-19 in Minnesota rose slightly to 416 on Thursday, and included 35 people receiving intensive care. The state also reported nine more COVID-19 deaths on Friday — all among the elderly — bringing its pandemic toll to 12,628. However, both trends have lagged during the pandemic, and health officials hope they follow the other downturns soon.

    Hospitalizations have been less severe in the latest wave – with just 8% of COVID-19 patients on Thursday requiring intensive care, compared to 30% in the early stages of the pandemic. More patients are being admitted for other purposes and only test positive on routine screening.

    High levels of immunity from vaccinations or coronavirus infections this winter reduce the severity of COVID-19 this spring, said Dr. Matthew Prekker, a specialist in critical care medicine at Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis.

    “The baseline risk in the population of getting so, so sick – which existed before we had widely accepted vaccines – is much lower now,” he said. “We’re also dealing with less virulent but highly transmissible strains of COVID… Fortunately, we’re not seeing as many serious illnesses as last year.”

    Sewage data was mixed last week — when the University of Minnesota showed stable or even declining virus levels in statewide sewage samples, but the Metropolitan Wastewater Treatment Plant of St. Paul showed an increase. However, the St. Paul plant on Friday reported a 38% drop in viral load in samples this week, matching the latest statewide wastewater trends.

    Viral levels remained stable or slightly higher, however, in wastewater analyzed at six plants in northeastern Minnesota. This aligns with the latest regional risk data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which identified high levels of COVID-19 in Koochiching, St. Louis, Pine and Carlton counties in northeast Minnesota.

    Freeborn, Olmsted and Winona counties in the south have also maintained CDC high-risk designations, meaning mask-wearing is recommended in indoor public places. CDC designations are based on infection and hospital counts and are designed to warn communities when their hospitals may be at risk of bed shortages. Most of the Twin Cities metro area remains at moderate risk for COVID-19, although Anoka and Carver counties are listed as low risk.

    Minnesota’s trends match those in the northeastern United States, particularly in New York City where risk levels and case counts are declining. The latest US pandemic wave appears to be heading south – with the CDC this week identifying an increase in high-risk counties in states such as Virginia.

    Levels of COVID-19 have declined in Minnesota over the past two summers, though they’ve risen in southern states, where hot temperatures are likely driving more people indoors and increasing their risks of viral transmission. .

    Health officials have warned of wildcards that could disrupt expectations of a mild summer, including the even faster-spreading BA.4 and BA.5 variants that were discovered in South Africa and have been found there. caused a rapid increase in infections.

    These two variants accounted for 11% of the viral load found in sewage this week at the St. Paul sewage treatment plant, up from 7% last week.

    Immunity also declines over time, and Minnesota is reporting a drop in the number of residents up to date with COVID-19 vaccinations – meaning they have completed the initial series and the first booster doses when recommended. .

    Only 47% of eligible Minnesotans five and older are current as of Friday, down from 49% last week. The expansion of booster recommendations last week to include children ages 5 to 11 has lowered that rate, as COVID-19 vaccination levels decline with age.

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