Metropolitan Hospital – Northwest Metropolitans http://northwestmetropolitans.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 07:22:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5.png Metropolitan Hospital – Northwest Metropolitans http://northwestmetropolitans.com/ 32 32 South Metro firefighter overcomes COVID and returns to duty https://northwestmetropolitans.com/south-metro-firefighter-overcomes-covid-and-returns-to-duty/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 05:11:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/south-metro-firefighter-overcomes-covid-and-returns-to-duty/ When Lt. Matt Searcy fell seriously ill with COVID-19, he was told he would never be a firefighter again. ARAPAHOE COUNTY, Colorado – A family that fights fires together stays together inside the ‘Animal House’. “Yes, that’s our little motto,” said firefighter Tristan D’Eboli. “Animal from the Muppets is our mascot.” South Metro Fire Station […]]]>

When Lt. Matt Searcy fell seriously ill with COVID-19, he was told he would never be a firefighter again.

ARAPAHOE COUNTY, Colorado – A family that fights fires together stays together inside the ‘Animal House’.

“Yes, that’s our little motto,” said firefighter Tristan D’Eboli. “Animal from the Muppets is our mascot.”

South Metro Fire Station 21 is named after a Muppet and full of characters.

“We just like crazy people,” D’Eboli said. “We like to be busy. We love scum.

The Animal House attracts a certain kind of fireman.

“People who work here want to work here at Station 21,” said firefighter HP Wilms. “Not only do we work hard, but we also play hard together.”

The Station 21 siblings give each other heartbreak from time to time. They also call each other.

“Everyone has nicknames,” said Wilms, whose real name is Herman. “We are an extended family.”

sickness strikes

On a Wednesday in early June, Wilms and D’Eboli began their shifts at the Animal House in the absence of the head of their family, a lieutenant affectionately known as “The Godfather.”

“There’s a big void there, that’s for sure,” agreed D’Eboli.

Lt. Matt Searcy started missing shifts months earlier, in late December 2021.

“It was just a sick callout, which wasn’t uncommon at the time, and then obviously it grew a lot from there,” D’Eboli said.

Jill Searcy sat on her living room couch scrolling through photos and videos she captured over the months.

“Just seeing it like that – it’s very difficult,” Jill Searcy said.

She barely recognized the image of a frail man in a hospital bed as the firefighter she married.

“Now Matt is the patient and he’s the one to take care of,” she said.

COMPLETE MAINTENANCE: Jill Searcy reflects on her husband’s battle with COVID-19

the hospital

Jill remembers the moment Matt walked into an emergency room at Sky Ridge Medical Center.

“He was in pretty bad shape,” she said. “Honestly, I didn’t know if he was going to last the night.”

A positive test for COVID-19 progressed to pneumonia and Matt was coughing up bright red blood, Jill said.

Matt was admitted to hospital and, due to COVID safety measures, Jill was unable to visit her husband’s bedside for over two weeks.

“I didn’t know how he was and if he was going to make it, it was very, very stressful,” Jill said.

Doctors intubated Matt, and as a ventilator helped him breathe, he suffered from staph infections, blood clots, kidney failure, liver failure and other complications.

“It was literally one bad thing after another,” Jill recalled.

The prognosis

She remembered the grave prognosis regarding Matt’s return to his profession.

“One of the doctors told me Matt would never be a firefighter again,” Jill said. “And I just remember thinking to myself, well, don’t say that in front of him because it’s going to crush him more than anything.”

Days passed with Matt in a coma and nurses struggling to control his fevers. Jill visited and sent daily updates to South Metro Fire and Animal House.

“It got worse and worse and worse and worse, and we’re like, ‘holy smoke,'” Wilms said.

“Just harder and harder to hear news when it’s your godfather,” D’Eboli said.

Firefighters were unable to visit Matt in person, but they cleaned the windows of his hospital and held up signs of support from outside for Jill to read. They also helped care for the Searcy family.

The firefighters dropped off the meals so Jill didn’t have to cook. They took Matt and Jill’s four kids to movies and bowling.

FULL INTERVIEW: Matt Searcy talks about his battle with COVID-19

The turnaround

Then the Godfather started to get better.

“It seemed like it was as fast as he went down, he came up, you know,” D’Eboli said.

A crowd of firefighters, friends, family and hospital staff cheered and cheered Matt as he was discharged from Sky Ridge Medical Center and taken to a rehabilitation center in Denver.

“I remember waking up in rehab, and my dad was sitting there, and he was like, ‘How long do you think you’ve been out?'” Matt Searcy recalled. “And I said, ‘uh, a few days?’ And he’s like, ‘no, you missed almost two months of your life.'”

Matt picks up the words one day and swings the next. He learned to walk again and returned home with Jill and their children. Doctors sent him home with an oxygen cylinder which he only used for two weeks.

“The miracle happened,” Matt said. “It just – it backfired.”

Matt credited Jill, a taekwondo instructor, with getting him back into shape.

“My wife is the strongest person I know,” he said. “She didn’t let me give up when I wanted to give up.”

Matt’s other motivating factor was the Animal House.

“I miss the camaraderie with the crew and the things we would do as a crew,” Matt said. “I miss the workouts we used to do and pulling pipes and throwing ladders and hitting fire hydrants and just driving and laughing.”

The return

Matt got to work and started taking tests. He passed lung function tests and treadmill stress tests at UCHealth. His scores paved the way for him to start training with South Metro’s wellness team.

He sweated through grueling workouts wearing full cargo gear. Coaches and fellow firefighters watched Matt get dressed in July for one final test.

He carried a heavy garden hose up the stairs, dragged a dummy across the floor, threw a ladder against a wall and climbed it, and beat a fireman’s ax against a rubber tire.

Matt finished the course in a sweat. His recovered lungs took deep breaths.

“Crushed,” a trainer told Matt. “Thanks, mate,” Matt replied, still catching his breath under his oxygen mask.

Months ago, Matt could barely breathe, but he was finally fit to be a firefighter.

Back to work

On July 31, 2022, The Godfather returned to the Animal House for his first shift in seven months. He was greeted with a banner welcoming him home and hugs from his siblings.

“Now we are excited,” said Tristan D’Eboli. “Super pumped. It’s going to be a very good day.

“He’s part of the crew and part of the family again,” HP Wilms said.

The Sunday morning shift started quietly. Matt had time to get his gear ready and laugh with his team at the kitchen table.

“You all got me back because I missed you all,” Matt said. “I’m so glad to be back.”

Then the first call came.

Lt. Matt Searcy and his fire crew entered the garage. Matt put on his suit and went to sit inside Engine 21.

“That’s what it’s all about,” Matt smiles. “That’s exciting.”

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6 events not to be missed https://northwestmetropolitans.com/6-events-not-to-be-missed/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 10:05:54 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/6-events-not-to-be-missed/ The holidays are about community and tradition and nothing says “celebrate” quite like a traditional Christmas tree lighting event. From Light Up Louisville, which takes place downtown, to smaller light up events in the community, here are six light up events happening this year to get you in the holiday spirit. WHAT: Holiday lights and […]]]>

The holidays are about community and tradition and nothing says “celebrate” quite like a traditional Christmas tree lighting event. From Light Up Louisville, which takes place downtown, to smaller light up events in the community, here are six light up events happening this year to get you in the holiday spirit.

WHAT: Holiday lights and an illuminated Christmas tree will light up the lawns of Jefferson Square and Metro Hall in downtown Louisville. The Lots of Lights Parade will parade down Jefferson Street with over 70 units. Light Up Louisville 2022 is presented by LG&E.

WHERE: Outside Metro Hall at Jefferson and Sixth streets in downtown Louisville

WHEN: 25 Nov, 3pm-10pm

MORE INFORMATION: LightUpLouisville.org.

Here is the full schedule of events:

Fireworks explode as the trees in Jefferson Square light up during Light Up Louisville.  November 26, 2021
  • Santa’s Workshop: Children and families are invited to visit Santa’s Workshop on Sixth Street to pick up crafts and cookies to decorate at home, as well as write letters to Santa and veterans as part of of the Honor Flight program and get a free photo with Santa Claus (from 3 pm).
  • Holiday Market: Open from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. at 6th and Jefferson streets, offering treats, holiday crafts, and decorations for purchase. Also beginning at 3 p.m., the Light Up Louisville Stage on Metro Hall’s West Lawn will feature live performances. Performers include DJ Jay Campbell, Made New, JD Shelburne and, to close out the night, The Louisville Crashers.
  • The Lots of Lights Parade: Led by Frosty the Snowman as Grand Marshal (7 p.m.). Begins at Seventh and Jefferson Streets, runs down Jefferson Street to Fourth Street, where it will turn and cross Fourth Street Live.
  • To light up: With Santa Claus and May Greg Fischer (8:30 p.m.). The Zambelli fireworks will follow.
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Family’s catalytic converter stolen from Albuquerque hospital https://northwestmetropolitans.com/familys-catalytic-converter-stolen-from-albuquerque-hospital/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 23:38:29 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/familys-catalytic-converter-stolen-from-albuquerque-hospital/ ALBUQUERQUE, NM (KRQE) – It keeps happening; someone’s catalytic converter was stolen. This time, the victims were parents in the emergency room caring for their very sick daughter. Matthew Medina said his wife’s catalytic converter was stolen from his car while they were at the downtown Presbyterian Hospital seeking help for their daughter with RSV. […]]]>

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (KRQE) – It keeps happening; someone’s catalytic converter was stolen. This time, the victims were parents in the emergency room caring for their very sick daughter.

Matthew Medina said his wife’s catalytic converter was stolen from his car while they were at the downtown Presbyterian Hospital seeking help for their daughter with RSV.

“We were in the ER for about 28 hours before being admitted,” Medina said.

At some point, his wife decided to go home to freshen up. As soon as she started her car, there was a loud noise. Right away, she knew something was wrong.

“I got out to see what was going on and realized I had to check around the vehicle and realized underneath that the catalytic converter had been taken,” Medina said.

Medina filed a report with the hospital security department and was shocked to learn that this was not the first time something like this had happened at the hospital.

“Security let me know that this is a recurring issue that occurs on the Presbyterian Hospital campus,” Medina said.

Medina said he was also told people’s gas tanks were siphoned off and cars were stolen from the parking lot.

KRQE contacted Presbyterian Hospital and they sent us the following statement:

Creating a safe and secure environment for our patients, visitors and staff is a top priority. We continue to improve security measures on campus at our Presbyterian Hospital, which include cameras, emergency call boxes, out-of-hours escorts, and regular patrols by security guards and of law enforcement. Unfortunately, despite these efforts, sometimes thefts occur in parking lots. We work closely with law enforcement to resolve reported incidents and continually look for other ways to ensure a safe campus for everyone.

Pete Camacho, vice president of security at Presbyterian Healthcare Services.

While catalytic converter thefts happen often, the Albuquerque Police Department said they haven’t necessarily seen an increase.

The city has entered theft reports on the Scrap Alert website to notify scrap recyclers when they know one is stolen, but thieves still manage to get money for the small amount of precious metal inside.

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Omaha Police Chief issues statement following mass shooting on Ames Ave. https://northwestmetropolitans.com/omaha-police-chief-issues-statement-following-mass-shooting-on-ames-ave/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 20:26:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/omaha-police-chief-issues-statement-following-mass-shooting-on-ames-ave/ Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer released a statement following the mass shooting early Sunday morning. It happened around 4:10 a.m. near 34th Avenue and Ames Avenue. It was initially reported that 11 people were injured, KETV Newswatch 7 confirmed with the Omaha Police Department that the number of people shot is now eight, including the […]]]>

Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer released a statement following the mass shooting early Sunday morning. It happened around 4:10 a.m. near 34th Avenue and Ames Avenue. It was initially reported that 11 people were injured, KETV Newswatch 7 confirmed with the Omaha Police Department that the number of people shot is now eight, including the deceased. Authorities confirmed that a victim was rushed to hospital while first responders performed CPR. The second victim was taken to hospital with serious injuries. According to Omaha police, one of the two victims transported by ambulance died. Authorities also said six other people had entered two metropolitan hospitals with various gunshot wounds. a party was held after hours and a confrontation ensued, resulting in gunfire. There is no indication that it was a random shooting. Additional OPD resources are being used and the police presence will increase for the time being. Omaha police have not announced any suspects or arrests. The department is asking anyone with information about this shooting to call Crime Stoppers at 402-444-STOP.

Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer released a statement following the mass shooting early Sunday morning.

It happened around 4:10 a.m. near 34th Avenue and Ames Avenue.

It was initially reported that 11 people were injured, KETV Newswatch 7 confirmed with the Omaha Police Department that the number of people shot is now eight, including the deceased.

Authorities confirmed that a victim was rushed to hospital while first responders performed CPR. The second victim was taken to hospital with serious injuries. According to Omaha police, one of the two victims transported by ambulance died.

Authorities also said six other people entered two metro hospitals with various gunshot wounds.

In a statement, Schmaderer said that “it is imperative that the OPD piece together what happened so that the victims and their families can find a solution. At this point in the investigation, a party was held after working hours and a confrontation ensued resulting in gunfire. There is no indication that it was a random shooting. Additional OPD resources are being used and the police presence will increase for the moment.

Omaha police have not announced any suspects or arrests. The department is asking anyone with information about this shooting to call Crime Stoppers at 402-444-STOP.

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Hospitals postpone pediatric surgeries as lack of capacity deepens https://northwestmetropolitans.com/hospitals-postpone-pediatric-surgeries-as-lack-of-capacity-deepens/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 10:40:27 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/hospitals-postpone-pediatric-surgeries-as-lack-of-capacity-deepens/ By delaying some elective pediatric surgeries, hospitals are trying to free up inpatient beds to deal with an unexpected increase in the number of children suffering from common viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV. “Unfortunately, we have had to postpone some scheduled procedural care for children due to the current high increase. This includes […]]]>

By delaying some elective pediatric surgeries, hospitals are trying to free up inpatient beds to deal with an unexpected increase in the number of children suffering from common viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV.

“Unfortunately, we have had to postpone some scheduled procedural care for children due to the current high increase. This includes some cardiac care,” said Dr. Paul Biddinger, head of preparedness and continuity at Mass General Brigham. “We have active incident management teams at Mass General Hospital for Children and for the Mass General Brigham system as a whole to maximize our capacity and try to avoid rescheduling necessary care, but the scale of the he increase has been so great that it is not always possible. »

Boston Children’s Hospital said it has been at capacity or overcapacity for nearly six weeks and expects its patient numbers to only increase through the winter months. As a result, the hospital was postponing cases where a delay would not be detrimental to a patient’s clinical condition.

“We reach out to patients and families as soon as we know their case is postponed,” said hospital spokeswoman Kristen Dattoli. “We recognize that this bothers everyone – no one wants to have delayed admissions – so we do our best to reach out when we know we have to postpone.”

Boston Medical Center said it has also postponed several scheduled surgeries for capacity reasons and is working daily with area hospitals to manage inpatient capacity.

Baystate Children’s Hospital is also delaying the few scheduled surgeries it has, postponing two that were scheduled over the next two weeks.

But the hospital isn’t doing enough scheduled surgeries for the delays to significantly improve its capacity issues, so Baystate is trying to build capacity in other ways. Already, the children’s hospital has asked community hospitals affiliated with the system to keep patients between the ages of 18 and 21 instead of sending them to the children’s hospital as they normally would. Pediatric overflow beds are also installed in the adult medical intensive care unit, or ICU.

Meanwhile, the hospital is watching with suspicion the rise in flu infections in Connecticut and the South of the country.

“We don’t have the beds for kids now for RSV and other respiratory viruses,” said Dr. Charlotte Boney, chief pediatrician at Baystate Children’s Hospital. “We are really worried about the flu.”

Last Monday, the Ministry of Public Health issued guidelines to hospitals facing capacity shortages. The guidelines included a recommendation that all emergency departments should be prepared to provide oxygen support to children through a high-flow nasal cannula – a treatment patients would typically receive upstairs. hospital after admission.

“Let’s hope this frees [beds]”Boney said.

DPH further stated that all hospitals with licensed pediatric beds must staff them, even if it requires the facility to use temporary or contract labor to do so.

The DPH also suggested that younger patients could be admitted to neonatal intensive care units and patients aged 15 and over could be admitted to the medical-surgical or adult intensive care floors, provided that experts pediatricians are available for consultation on child care.

Hospitals should also use beds available at community hospitals and transfer patients there as needed, according to state guidelines.

However, transferring patients to more intensive beds has become extremely tricky. According to a snapshot of bed availability provided daily by Boston MedFlight to area hospitals and obtained by The Globe, Massachusetts General Hospital’s 13-bed pediatric intensive care unit was full on Monday, and only two of its 21 beds were in need. neonatal intensive care unit were available. Brigham and Women’s Hospital had three of the NICU’s 60 beds.

No beds were available in the pediatric intensive care units or PICUs at Boston Medical Center or Baystate Medical Center. PICUs were also full at Maine Medical Center, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire, and Hasbro Children’s Hospital in Rhode Island.

According to Boston MedFlight, as of Tuesday morning there were only about a dozen PICU beds available in all of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, southern Maine and Rhode Island.

In addition to delaying pediatric surgeries, some hospitals must provide care that would normally be provided in ICUs in low-intensity beds, such as for a child in respiratory distress requiring continuous nebulization. And while the use of certain therapies could automatically send a patient to intensive care in the past, now it’s all about whether there’s a bed.

“If they need intensive care and a bed is available, we will transfer them there. But we want to make sure we can provide the care they need if a bed isn’t available,” Biddinger said. “That’s why many systems, including ours, are providing more support from our critical care doctors and nurses to clinicians on the floor or in the ER, and trying to deploy additional support from respiratory therapists. , and increased training on these therapies for clinicians in the pediatric setting in general.

National data shows earlier and higher RSV-associated hospitalizations this season than in previous years. Over the past five years, hospitalizations for RSV have only peaked in December and January. But as of last month, hospitalizations had already reached or surpassed the peaks of several previous years.

Even hospitals that have not yet delayed scheduled surgeries remain concerned about their capacity. South Shore Health said it was not postponing pediatric surgeries, although 14 of its 18 pediatric beds were occupied Wednesday morning.

UMass Memorial Medical Center said it is experiencing a high volume of pediatric patients due to RSV, influenza and COVID, combined with the ongoing behavioral health crisis. As of Tuesday, the hospital’s pediatric bed capacity was 115%, meaning children who have been admitted to hospital have to wait in the emergency room until the beds become free.

“At this time, elective pediatric surgeries have not been canceled, however, we continue to monitor the situation and review the status of our bed and each case to determine if an elective procedure can be safely postponed or if we have the capacity to proceed,” said Dr. Lawrence Rhein, chairman of the hospital’s pediatric department.

Globe staff’s Kay Lazar contributed to this report.


Jessica Bartlett can be contacted at jessica.bartlett@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @ByJessBartlett.

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Second teenager arrested for shooting injured Commanders player https://northwestmetropolitans.com/second-teenager-arrested-for-shooting-injured-commanders-player/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 15:18:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/second-teenager-arrested-for-shooting-injured-commanders-player/ The arrest of the two teenagers does not close the Metropolitan Police Department’s investigation, as they are still looking for another youngster involved. WASHINGTON—ONE second teenager was arrested in connection with the August shooting that injured Washington Commanders running back Brian Robinson, according to DC font. On Wednesday, a 17-year-old, who was 16 at the […]]]>

The arrest of the two teenagers does not close the Metropolitan Police Department’s investigation, as they are still looking for another youngster involved.

WASHINGTON—ONE second teenager was arrested in connection with the August shooting that injured Washington Commanders running back Brian Robinson, according to DC font.

On Wednesday, a 17-year-old, who was 16 at the time of the incident, was arrested for his involvement in the shooting that sent Robinson to hospital with leg and hip injuries. Two days later, the second teenager, 15, who was 14 at the time of the shooting, was identified and arrested for his connection to the shooting.

The two teenagers were charged with assault with intent to steal while armed (firearm).

The charges stem from an investigation which began on August 28 when Robinson was shot dead during an attempted robbery just before 5.30pm on H Street Northeast. The two armed teenagers approached him and attempted to rob him. During the attempted robbery, one of the teenagers fired a gun, which struck Robinson.

The teenagers left the scene in a vehicle without getting anything from Robinson. The Commanders running back was taken to a local hospital for treatment for his non-life-threatening injuries.

Robinson returned to the field on October 9 after team doctors cleared him to play against the Tennessee Titans. Even though the return match did not give the team a victory, Robinson still left the stadium happy.

“It was wonderful, just getting back on the court, having fun with my coaches and my team again,” Robinson said. “It was just a great day for me, honestly.”

The arrest of the two teenagers does not close the Metropolitan Police Department’s investigation, as they are still on the hunt for another youngster involved – the person who drove the getaway car.

The two teenagers, both from northeast DC, add to the more than 900 minors who have already been arrested in the district so far this year, which is an alarming statistic for the region, the chief said. of DC Police, Robert Contee.

The investigation remains active and ongoing.

Anyone with knowledge of this incident should take no action, but call police at 202-727-9099 or text your tip to the Department’s TEXT TIP LINE at 50411.

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Man hospitalized after being shot near Cardinal Stadium https://northwestmetropolitans.com/man-hospitalized-after-being-shot-near-cardinal-stadium/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 03:10:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/man-hospitalized-after-being-shot-near-cardinal-stadium/ A man was taken to hospital after he was shot a few blocks from Cardinal Stadium on Wednesday night. The Louisville Metro Police Department said it received calls about a shooting around 7:45 p.m. in the 2800 block of South 2nd Street in the South Louisville neighborhood. .On arriving at the scene, they found a […]]]>

A man was taken to hospital after he was shot a few blocks from Cardinal Stadium on Wednesday night. The Louisville Metro Police Department said it received calls about a shooting around 7:45 p.m. in the 2800 block of South 2nd Street in the South Louisville neighborhood. .On arriving at the scene, they found a man who had been shot. Police said he was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Agents from the LMPD’s Fourth Division are investigating the shooting. They said there were no suspects at the moment.

A man was taken to hospital after being shot a few blocks from Cardinal Stadium on Wednesday night.

The Louisville Metro Police Department said it received calls about a shooting around 7:45 p.m. in the 2800 block of South 2nd Street in the South Louisville neighborhood.

Upon arriving at the scene, they found a man who had been shot.

Police said he was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Officers from the LMPD’s Fourth Division are investigating the shooting. They said there were no suspects at the moment.

Anyone with information is urged to call the anonymous Crime Tip hotline at 502-574-LMPD (5673) or use the anonymous Crime Tip portal at the LMPD Crime Tip Portal.

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Home Sites in the Chicago Metro Area Highlight National Showcase of Auction Properties https://northwestmetropolitans.com/home-sites-in-the-chicago-metro-area-highlight-national-showcase-of-auction-properties/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 14:45:00 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/home-sites-in-the-chicago-metro-area-highlight-national-showcase-of-auction-properties/ TALLAHASSEE, Florida, October 31, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Prime residential sites in the Chicago metro area are being offered in an auction that ends Nov. 16, along with properties in five other states. The 133 Illinois home sites are being sold by a group of investors. They include 18 sites in Cypress Park, 38 sites in Olympia Fields, […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE, Florida, October 31, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Prime residential sites in the Chicago metro area are being offered in an auction that ends Nov. 16, along with properties in five other states.

The 133 Illinois home sites are being sold by a group of investors. They include 18 sites in Cypress Park, 38 sites in Olympia Fields, seven sites in Minooka, 43 sites in Wilmington and 27 sites in Joliet. Seven Hills Auctions is hosting the auction in association with Rick Levin & Associates on 7HAuctions.com.

“These are well-located home sites in desirable subdivisions and will be of interest to builders, investors or private individuals,” said Buddy Lee, president of the auction company.

The auction includes several Georgia highlights, including a newly built home in Cumming; a four-bedroom house in College Park; a house in Moultrie and a medical condominium in Jasper. In the bustling northern suburb of Alpharetta, the offerings include a 3,040 square foot commercial building.

In Wichita, Kansas, the auction includes a former specialty hospital, with 42,839 square feet on 2.56 acres.

Properties in Florida include residential and commercial land in Havana and Tallahassee. The offerings also include a commercial building in Aliceville, Alabama, and a home in Picayune, Mississippi.

“Sellers include banks, hedge funds, private equity groups and other highly motivated sellers,” Lee said.

Auctions are ongoing on www.7hauctions.com. People wanting additional information can call 800-742-9165. Bidding will end on November 16.

Tallahassee-based Seven Hills Auctions sells a wide range of assets nationwide, including commercial and residential real estate, businesses, farmland and bank-owned properties.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221031005522/en/

contacts

Carl Carter, 205-910-1952

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Study finds persistent disparities in access https://northwestmetropolitans.com/study-finds-persistent-disparities-in-access/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 03:00:26 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/study-finds-persistent-disparities-in-access/ According to an analysis published in Open JAMA Network October 28. The study, conducted by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University at Albany, SUNY, covered the period between 2011 and 2019, a time when access to prenatal care (defined by study as health care provided to pregnant women […]]]>

According to an analysis published in Open JAMA Network October 28.

The study, conducted by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University at Albany, SUNY, covered the period between 2011 and 2019, a time when access to prenatal care (defined by study as health care provided to pregnant women in the first trimester) was increased in states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

While access to timely prenatal care has increased overall after the expansion of Medicaid, disparities between immigrant and US-born pregnant women have increased among those of Hispanic descent. In states that expanded Medicaid, 76.3% of immigrant Hispanic pregnant women received timely prenatal care after the expansion, compared to about 81.1% of American-born Hispanic pregnant women.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one in four births in the United States is to an immigrant or non-US citizen. Some immigrants are excluded from safety net programs, including Medicaid, which provides health care to low-income US citizens.

“Our study shows that exclusions of immigrants from Medicaid eligibility can exacerbate disparities,” said co-corresponding author Teresa Janevic, PhD, MPH, associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and life sciences. reproduction, population health science and policy, and health systems design and global health. at Icahn Mount Sinai. “Timely and appropriate access to antenatal care is important because it benefits mothers and infants beyond pregnancy and childbirth. We know that insurance coverage before pregnancy leads to an earlier start of prenatal care; therefore, Medicaid coverage before pregnancy is an important lever for improving timely prenatal care.

The cross-sectional analysis used data from the National Center for Health Statistics and examined the prenatal care of more than 6 million pregnant people before and after Medicaid expansion in 16 states, including 400,000 immigrant pregnant women. The researchers also took into account characteristics such as age, number of children, level of education, race and ethnicity.

Dr. Janevic said the findings could inform current policy discussions about maternal health equity, demonstrating that some Medicaid coverage restrictions based on immigration status contribute to disparities between the native-born and immigrants seeking prenatal care in the United States. The study also encourages health care workers and policymakers to address how citizen exclusions from health care and benefits contribute to the structural racism faced by immigrant communities, she said.

“Non-citizens face many barriers to obtaining health coverage during and outside of pregnancy,” said co-corresponding author Ashley M. Fox, PhD, MA, associate professor of public administration and politics at the University of Albany, SUNY. “The pathways available to immigrants to access care are often complex and vary by qualifying status, time spent in the country, and state or locality of residence. Recent policy changes that expanded Medicaid eligibility, both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, have often inadvertently or inadvertently excluded immigrants.

About Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai Health System is one of the largest academic medical systems in the New York metropolitan area, with more than 43,000 employees working in eight hospitals, more than 400 outpatient practices, nearly 300 laboratories, a nursing school and a large school of medicine and higher education. Mount Sinai advances health for everyone, everywhere, by addressing the most complex health challenges of our time – discovering and applying new knowledge and scientific knowledge; developing safer and more effective treatments; train the next generation of medical leaders and innovators; and supporting local communities by providing high quality care to all who need it.

Through the integration of its hospitals, laboratories and schools, Mount Sinai offers comprehensive healthcare solutions from birth to geriatrics, leveraging innovative approaches such as artificial intelligence and IT while keeping patients’ medical and emotional needs at the center of all treatments. The health system includes approximately 7,300 primary and specialty care physicians; 13 joint venture day surgery centers in the five boroughs of New York, Westchester, Long Island and Florida; and over 30 affiliated community health centers. We are regularly ranked by US News and World Report‘s Best Hospitals, receiving a high “Honor Roll” status, and are highly ranked: #1 in Geriatrics and top 20 in Cardiology/Cardiac Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/Gastrointestinal Surgery, Neurology/Neurosurgery, orthopaedics, pulmonology/lung Surgery, rehabilitation and urology. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked #12 in ophthalmology. US News and World ReportMount Sinai Kravis Children’s Hospital’s “Best Hospitals for Children” ranking is one of the best in the country in several pediatric specialties. The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is one of three medical schools that has distinguished itself by several indicators: it is consistently ranked in the top 20 by US News and World Report“Best Medical Schools”, aligned with a US News and World Report “Honor Roll” Hospital, and among the top 20 in the nation for funding from the National Institutes of Health and among the top 5 in the nation for many areas of basic and clinical research. Newsweek“World’s Best Smart Hospitals” ranks Mount Sinai Hospital #1 in New York and among the top five in the world, and Mount Sinai Morningside in the top 30 worldwide; Newsweek Mount Sinai Hospital also ranks Mount Sinai Hospital leading in 11 specialties as “World’s Best Specialty Hospitals” and “America’s Best Physical Rehabilitation Centers”.

For more information, visit https://www.mountsinai.org or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


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Strong earthquake injures dozens and closes airport in northern Philippines https://northwestmetropolitans.com/strong-earthquake-injures-dozens-and-closes-airport-in-northern-philippines/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 03:36:28 +0000 https://northwestmetropolitans.com/strong-earthquake-injures-dozens-and-closes-airport-in-northern-philippines/ MANILA, Philippines — A massive earthquake shook much of the northern Philippines, injuring at least 26 people and forcing the closure of an international airport and the evacuation of patients to a hospital, officials said Wednesday. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology said Tuesday night’s magnitude 6.4 quake, triggered by movement in a local […]]]>

MANILA, Philippines — A massive earthquake shook much of the northern Philippines, injuring at least 26 people and forcing the closure of an international airport and the evacuation of patients to a hospital, officials said Wednesday.

The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology said Tuesday night’s magnitude 6.4 quake, triggered by movement in a local fault, was centered 9 kilometers (5 miles) northwest of the town of Lagayan in the province of Abra at a depth of 11 kilometers (7 miles).

The US tsunami warning system said no warnings or advisories had been issued.

The quake was felt over a wide area of ​​the main northern Luzon region, including parts of metro Manila, more than 400 kilometers (248 miles) south of Abra.

At least 26 people were injured in Ilocos Norte, the home province of President Ferdinand Marcos Jr., where the capital Laoag International Airport was ordered to close temporarily on Wednesday due to earthquake damage, police and civil aviation officials said.

In the town of Batac, also in Ilocos Norte, patients were moved out of the province’s largest hospital after parts of the ceiling of the intensive care unit fell as the building swayed. Medical consultation services have been temporarily suspended as engineers assess damage to the building, officials said.

Marcos Jr, who was in Manila, said authorities were inspecting roads and buildings and welfare officials were providing assistance to affected residents in northern provinces. “Everyone is advised to stay away from large structures,” the president said in a tweet.

In the town of La Paz in Abra, a century-old Christian church was damaged, parts of its belfry collapsed and some walls cracked, littering the church’s grassy courtyard with debris, officials said.

At least two towns in Cagayan province temporarily lost power due to damaged power lines. A number of bridges and roads in outlying provinces were damaged.

In July, a magnitude 7 earthquake caused landslides and damaged buildings in Abra and other northern provinces, killing at least five people and injuring dozens.

In 1990, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake killed nearly 2,000 people in the northern Philippines and caused extensive damage, including in the capital, Manila.

The Philippine archipelago sits on the “Pacific Ring of Fire”, a region along much of the rim of the Pacific Ocean where numerous volcanic eruptions and earthquakes occur, making the nation a Southeast Asia is one of the most disaster-prone in the world.

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